Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Narcissists & the Paranormal

By Lisa Maliga

According to a prolific blogger, Sandra Sparks, it turns out that Kirby Robinson is the inspiration for my novel entitled: Love Me, Need Me: A Narcissist's Tale. Ms. Sparks found the time to write about it in her blog on Thursday, October 6, 2011. [Her blog has been parked as of October 10, but the EoTP team has screenshots of all the blogs].

In the middle of the long and aggravating experience of dealing with the constant posts from a self proclaimed demonologist/exorcist/psychic/medium named Kirby Robinson, Psychic Kids' Christopher Fleming wanted me to be sure to read up on narcissism. I didn't have to - I understood. So does Lisa Maliga, Kirby's editor of his self published e-books. Just the word describes Kirby.

Lisa wrote him into one of her own novels  I would give you the link, but, in an earlier version of this entry, I think something was attached to the link that didn't allow for the material to appear on the published page - or something more unexplainable was going on. This description of her novel will probably disappear quickly after I publish this, but it was written by Lisa to describe her own book, and was public at the time this entry is written:

"Love Me, Need Me is about a bumbling sexual predator, narcissist, and author of three insipid zombie books. Middle aged Arlen J. Stevenson hails from Alabama. His relentless and often hilarious pursuit of women leads him to our other protagonist, Los Angeles-based writer of term papers, Helena Hoffman...

...we see Arlen's self-absorbed lifestyle as he endeavors to screw his numerous catches all over the South. Helena and Arlen get friendlier via their online communication, and he invites her to be his personal manager because of her communication skills, gullibility factor and location..."

Middle aged Kirby J. Robinson hails from Indiana. That is just too rhymingly poetic to be a coincidence. And the description is too close to things people who have been the targets of his harassment have noticed about Kirby - he goes after people who have the things he wants: attention for being what he wants to be. People who are on the inside, who are on television, on radio, in the spotlight, and making income for talents he can't begin to have.  His jealousy knows no end - seriously. I have volumes of screen prints of posts because he just can't stop harassing people.

If you look at most of his posts one at a time, you wonder where the harassment is. He loves to spout bible-isms. Which is funny coming from a self proclaimed Buddhist. He loves Chip Coffey. When he doesn't hate him. He hates Christopher Fleming because Chris is young, good looking and has everything, everything, Kirby wants for himself. He uses lots of sock puppets - when they aren't praising Kirby, they're saying mean things Kirby wouldn't dare say out loud himself. I think that's why he likes Ron Tebo: Ron is mean. Kirby is - seriously - not of this planet. He is the kind of troll which compells you to be there to understand how awful he really is. But if you are there observing him at his game, that's what he wants - the attention. Be his mirror. He'll only see his own reflection, not you. The only mirror that really bothers him is me, because I am much too clear a mirror. That's why he has mounted a heavy attack against me, that only reveals his own deep dishonesty and flawed personality.

And I find, with the words his best friend wrote - that's all he is. A fictional character. There are real people to attend to.

Ms. Sparks neglected to use the full title and description of my book. Here it is:

"Love Me, Need Me: A Narcissist's Tale" is about a bumbling sexual predator, narcissist, and author of three insipid zombie books. Middle-aged Arlen J. Stevenson hails from Alabama. His relentless and often hilarious pursuit of women online leads him to our other protagonist, Los Angeles-based writer of term papers, Helena Hoffman. She isn’t aware of what Arlen is as she only sees his amusing and entertaining side in their daily email correspondence. 

Told in alternating points of view, we see Arlen’s self-absorbed lifestyle as he endeavors to screw his numerous catches all over the South. Helena and Arlen get friendlier via their online communication, and he invites her to be his personal manager because of her communications skills, gullibility factor and location. Unlike his other victims, she never sends him pictures of herself, but she launches a MySpace site for his new company. Soon he realizes there are thousands of available women in his region alone! Unlike the jailbait that many online stalkers pursue, Arlen chases after their mothers and grandmothers. Helena is aware of his perpetual cheating and decides to investigate it in person. What happens after that is alternately scary and darkly humorous.

Contains graphic sexual content and language.

It's evident that Ms. Sparks failed to read the book. Had she done so, it would have been clear that the character of Arlen is a lot different than Kirby. 
Here are some dissimilarities:

Kirby is from Indiana, not Alabama. Both states are east of the Mississippi River and end with the letter 'A'. Not much of a comparison here.

Kirby is legally blind and is unable to drive. Arlen wears glasses but does lots of driving in his vehicle which he's named the Truckin' Temple of Love.

Kirby doesn't write zombie books. Arlen has written three of them, including Zombies on the I-285. Kirby writes nonfiction and hasn't been to Atlanta.

Kirby avoids any instant message programs. Arlen keeps adding screen names so he can flirt with his victims incessantly.

Unfortunately, there are many real people like Arlen hanging out on the 'net in chatrooms, forums, Facebook, blogs, MySpace and lots of other places. Yes, I've encountered narcissists online and offline. You don't live in Southern California for any amount of time without encountering a few of them! I wrote this book to warn others of the dangers of online stalkers.

I also wonder about the futility of someone comparing a fictitious character to a person they've never met! 

Amazingly enough, I'm able to add a link to the book without any difficulty!

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