Sunday, July 14, 2013

Ghost Hunting Certification & Paranormal Ethics – Wednesday, July 17, 2013


It’s 3 AM, you’re awakened by the noise of doors slamming, the sound of tapping on the walls, and you see hallway lights flicker off and on.  You get out of bed and find you’re the only one in the house. You try to reason what just took place and all you can come up with that is that it’s a ghost. A bit frightened, you decided that maybe it’s time to call your local ghost hunting group to come over and investigate.

Who are you letting into your home? Are they trained? Do they really know what a ghost is? Or a demon? Do they think that demons and ghosts are interchangeable? Are these ghost hunters convicted felons or child abusers? Maybe you’ve asked for the ghost hunters’ credentials and are told you have nothing to worry about. But do you?

They find something and things calm down and everything goes back to normal — for now — until one day when you’re surfing the internet and you notice photos of your home on that paranormal group’s website. You also find those photos on other related sites. Those local ghost hunters have published the findings of your case on the web! Did you give permission for them to do so? You also might discover that they’ve made money off your case, using it in a book and/or video was used to pitch a show idea. They’ve also done lectures at paranormal conferences, where the team leader was paid to give a presentation of your case, but you never gave permission for any of this. Not only were you unknowingly exploited, you weren’t compensated.

On the other side of the spectrum, maybe you want to be a ghost hunter, a paranormal investigator, or a demon chaser. You watch Ghost Hunters, Ghost Adventures, My Ghost Story and other paranormal shows. You listen to paranormal radio, and read everything on the subject. You have a Facebook page, a Twitter page, and a YouTube account. You’ve spent hundreds, if not thousands of dollars, on a variety of gadgets — but does that really make you a ghost hunter?

You decide to take a class that will lead you to being a certified ghost hunter. It’s an online class and it’s the equivalent of about 10 hours of field study. To get your certification, all you need to do is read a book, take a test, and get a photo ID. After accomplishing these things, you receive a fancy looking certificate that says you’re a certified ghost hunter. Who certified the people who certify you? Can you cover the topics about the paranormal in a few hours?

We'll also talk about my forthcoming book on Theresa Caputo Is the Long Island Medium the Real Deal?

As a weekly feature, Kirby will also share some book reviews and recommendations, as well as his infamous incredible "BAD BAD Thing Awards."

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1 comment:

Anonymous said...

That's really frightening, to place your trust in a paranormal group or deliverance minister and later have that trust betrayed or contact abruptly severed...even after they promise they'll never abandon you or betray your trust. There really needs to be a code of ethics for this profession. Kirby, have you ever thought of starting your own paranormal version of "Angie's List"?

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